3 Worthy Findings From This Week

Image credit: Ngamihi Photography via Under The Radar

Andrew Stanton – The Clues To A Great Story. Ted Talk

 

We’re all attracted to stories. In books, movies, TV, music, and art. We write our own stories as we go. We create work that tells a story on some level, whether literally or in a more abstract form.

Andrew Stanton is an American film director, screenwriter, producer and voice actor based at Pixar. He has also directed 2 episodes of Stranger Things.

More or less in his words: Storytelling ideally confirms some truth that deepens our understanding of who we are as humans, affirmation that our lives have meaning.

 

Aldous Harding – Horizon

 

After experiencing Aldous Harding at Laneways at the end of January, I’ve been unable to get her out of my head. The way she slouched on the stool, dressed in white with her white guitar, legs apart, scowling at us with a bemused disdain. Her voice. The theatrical performance, unpretty, powerful. I was given the album last week and spent a day listening to the whole thing over and over while arting, and then did what I always do when discovering new music, which is zeroing in on one song and listening until I have absorbed it. I feel intoxicated after listening to Horizon on repeat all day. And her performance on Jools Holland is everything. Terrifying, amusing, awe-inspiring, defiant, and beautiful.

 

 

Still Life With Woodpecker – Tom Robbins

 

I read this maybe 10 years ago and recently decided to read it again. It’s a novel that has it all: A princess and an outlaw (both redheads), love, pyramids, dynamite, and a pack of Camel’s.

This is my favourite passage in the book:

“How can one person be more real than any other? Well, some people do hide and others seek. Maybe those who are in hiding – escaping encounters, avoiding surprises, protecting their property, ignoring their fantasies, restricting their feelings, sitting out the Pan pipe hootchy-kootch of experience – maybe these people, people who won’t talk to rednecks, or if they’re rednecks won’t talk to intellectuals, people who are afraid to get their shoes muddy or their noses wet, afraid to eat what they crave, afraid to drink Mexican water, afraid to bet a long shot to win, afraid to hitchhike, jaywalk, honkytonk, cogitate, osculate, levitate, rock it, bob it, sock it, or bark at the moon, maybe such people are simply inauthentic, and maybe the jackleg humanist who says differently is due to have his tongue fried on the hot slabs of liar’s hell. Some folks hide, and some folks seek, and seeking, when it’s mindless, neurotic, or desperate can be a form of hiding. But there are folks who want to know and aren’t afraid to look and won’t turn tail should they find it – and if they do, they’ll have a good time anyway because nothing, neither the terrible truth or the absence of it, is going to cheat them out of one honest breath of earth’s sweet grass.”

 

Let me sign off with a bonus quote from Hugh MacLeod: “The best way to get approval is not to need it.”

 

And a little shameless self promotion: To visit my Etsy store, click here: Rollingaskalou

7 Books That Make A Difference To How You Create – And Why

I Love my books. I talk about them a lot, pretty much every day, to my friends. “I read this book, you would love it…” That kind of thing. Fiction as well as non-fiction. But this post is about a small stack of books that I’ve come across in the past 2-3 years, that have made a difference to my life, particularly creatively. Are they self help books? Yes, I guess they would land in this category. But they all deliver in a big way, and if you’re like me, and you want to learn, you want to improve, you have something you want to do, want to create, something that will give your life purpose maybe even, these books are well worth your time and energy.

So, to put them all in one place and for what it’s worth, here’s my little couldn’t-have-done-it-without selection:

Get It Done – Sam Bennett

Sam Bennett is the cool aunt you wish you had. The one who knows, who has the answers, who can help you get unstuck, and give you that much needed kick up the bum. She knows what she’s talking about and she’ll let you in on all her methods and ways to become the creative person you want to be, in her own amusing and highly engaging way.

I got a lot from this book. It worked on so many different levels for me, both for my writing and my art making. It made me a doer. And it made me less afraid to be an artist and to call myself an artist. You know? And just get on with creating. I gave my own copy away recently to a friend who always wanted to be a textile designer. I’ll buy another copy soon and probably end up giving that one away too.

 

Bird By Bird – Anne Lamott

Anne Lamott’s Bird By Bird is essentially a guide to life, and though often times recommended for writers, her wisdom applies to anyone wanting to make anything. She writes with a beautiful honesty and sense of humour, about the creative process, about moving forwards, and about the rewards that comes from sticking with it. A book to savour, it’s captivating and insightful and true.

It helped me find my way into my writing and helped me to gain momentum. I would love to meet Anne Lamott one day, she’s one amazing lady.

Click here to read an excellent review (via Brain Pickings).

 

Big Magic – Elizabeth Gilbert

A friend recommended this book to me when I bumped into her and told her I was trying to write a book. I bought it online, it arrived, and immediately the pink cover and even the title put me off. One of those books, I thought. Fluffy self help stuff. I flicked through the first pages. Put it on the shelf. And there it sat for a while until I noticed it again one day, thankfully with a less judgemental mindset.

Elizabeth Gilbert is so right in everything she says. She talks about fear and courage, ideas and the muse, and that Big Magic that comes with trusting the universe while creating something. I love this book.

Watch her hugely inspiring Ted Talk here.

 

Reinvent Yourself – James Altucher

I talk about this guy a lot. I send links of his articles to friends and random people. The first blog post I wrote was about James Altucher and how he is more or less responsible for all the good shit that’s happened to me in the past year. Whenever I’m feeling a bit stuck, I go back to his articles and his Reinvent Yourself book.

Read this article and you’ll see what I mean.

A recurring theme in James Altucher’s writings is ideas. Write 10 ideas a day and you’ll be an ideas machine. Try it. It’s fun.

I wrote down 10 ideas of how I can meet James Altucher. Maybe one day I will.

 

Notes From A Friend – Tony Robbins

Chances are you’ve heard of Tony Robbins. You might have watched that really intense I Am Not Your Guru thing on Netflix and if you haven’t, maybe don’t. Instead, have a little sit down with this very short book. Take some notes.

My favourite quote in the book: You can should all over yourself.

Tony Robbins talks about deciding what’s most important to you. Decide what you want, commit to it, and then take massive action, every day, to make it happen. Put simply, you can become who you want to become, by focussing on where you want to go, having purpose in everything you do, and believing that you can.

This little book put everything into perspective for me. What do I want? Who do I want to be? Why do I want to be that person? What are my goals in life? After sitting down and figuring it out, and narrowing the focus, it all makes more sense.

I know I can. And now I do.

 

Show Your Work – Austin Kleon

The sequel to the also excellent Steal Like An Artist, this is a great prompt to get yourself and your work out there, how to do it, and to keep doing. It’s full of invaluable advice for the artist who is ready, whatever your art might be.

Austin Kleon talks about taking chances, experimenting, and following your whims. Learn in front of others. Talk about what you love. Think process, not product. Take people behind the scenes. Share consistently. Tell stories. Engage and connect with your people. It’s great stuff.

 

Turning Pro – Steven Pressfield

Going from the amateur mindset and what Steven Pressfield calls our shadow life (where we pursue callings that take us nowhere and permit ourselves to be controlled by compulsions that we cannot understand), to the mindset of a professional:

1. The professional shows up every day
2. The professional stays on the job all day
3. The professional is committed over the long haul
4. For the professional, the stakes are high and real
5. The professional is patient
6. The professional seeks order
7. The professional demystifies
8. The professional acts in the face of fear
9. The professional accepts no excuses
10. The professional plays it as it lays
11. The professional is prepared
12. The professional does not show off
13. The professional dedicates himself to mastering technique
14. The professional does not hesitate to ask for help
15. The professional does not take failure or success personally
16. The professional does not identify with his or her instrument
17. The professional endures adversity
18. The professional self-validates
19. The professional reinvents herself
20. The professional is recognized by other professionals

Turning Pro made me turn pro. I went into warrior mode. Set up my website and my Etsy store.

It’s a work in progress but, heck man, I’m doing it!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Altucher made me do it.

James Altucher is responsible for this.
I came across one of his articles in November, 2016, in which he wrote about how to quit your job. This was the first of many James Altucher articles for me.

This is what happened:
In January, 2017, I decided to quit drinking for a year. Then I wrote a middle-grade novel in about 4 months and around May I resigned from my gallery event coordinator job and enrolled in art school. Did a photography course. I rewrote and edited my novel. Then I started drinking again. And stopped again after 2 months. I made some art. Finished my novel. Sent submissions out to literary agents in the UK and US. Started getting up at 6am and going for a run. Got (kindly but surely) rejected by 5 of the 7 agents I submitted to. Put Plan B into motion.
This past year has been about tuning into the right station and paying attention to the true frequency. It’s been about learning. I’ve learned a lot. Put some ideas into action.
This is what my blog is about.
If you’re reading this, chances are that you and I are following the same signal. Parallel journeys. That kind of thing. If that’s the case, feel free to say hi.